Tag Archives: Running

Eating, Running, and Burning: How to Break the Rules

RUNNING WORLD, BEWARE! I AM NOMAX, THE BREAKER OF RULES.

Running, like many activities, has well-known “rules” everyone can recite and that the periodicals periodically parrot. Such as, “9 Things You Should Never Do Before Running” and other such click bait implying that breaking them will wreck your training and cause your <insert favorite body part here> to fall off.

Well, screw that.

In the space of a week recently I broke not one, but THREE rules regarding running and racing. I’m not saying they were particularly smart things to do, but I lived to tell about it.

1.  Don’t Stuff Your Face and Then Run Really Fast (#1 of the 9 Things)

Unless, of course, it is Pi Day (3/14) and there is a race involving pie. Really good pie. And you’re stupid ambitious enough to enter the “Eat & Run” division, where you have to eat some pie before running.

Well, seasoned ultrarunners like me are used to eating and running. What’s one little piece of pie before a puny little 5K?

Yep, that’s one quarter of an entire pie. Which you must eat without using hands. And there’s a time penalty for not finishing. So there was nothing for it but to – well, see below.

And hell, if you’re going that far, might as well go all the way, with a “pie in the face” at the finish line.

The result? I finished second. Can’t wait for the Pizza Race!

2.  Don’t Do a Long Run The First Time You Wear New Shoes (#5 of the 9 Things)

Last Saturday I went to my favorite running store and bought me a new pair of road shoes. They fit well, and they felt good in the store. So the next day, I took them on a test run. Fortwentythreemiles.

See, I have some long road races this year, and my lightweight, minimally cushioned shoes weren’t gonna cut it. And the only way to know if the shoes will work for a long run is – to take them on a long run.

Now I did take some precautions. I taped my heels, took a spare pair of socks, and stopped halfway through for a gear check. But everything went smoothly, with much less leg fatigue than I was expecting. I think these shoes will work fine. But I’ll do a few short runs in them just to be sure.

3.  Don’t Run an Ultramarathon in the Desert in the Middle of Summer

(Surprisingly, this is NOT one of the 9 Things. Perhaps it’s too obvious even for this type of article.)

Okay, so I admit that the Badwater Ultra – 135 miles in Death Valley in July – is not a good idea for most people (if anyone). Definitely not on my radar. But a lil ‘ol 50K in Nevada at the end of August? Sure, why not?

And so I will be running the Burning Man 50K this year. This week I took the first step by registering for next week’s ticket sale. Assuming I get one, it is ON! All I need to do is figure out how I’m going to live for a week in the desert with no electricity, only the food and water I bring, and deal with possible 100-degree heat the entire time. And stay healthy enough to run a 50K in the bargain.

Perhaps there are some rules after all that really should NOT be broken. (from the votecharlie.com blog)

Now the karma believers among you may think I’ve stretched the rubber band about as far as I can, and it’s just a matter of time before the inevitable snap back. If and when that happens, I’ll humbly apologize to the universe here on this blog.

But until then, I’ll do my best to not break rule #9 – Doubt Yourself. Running, after all, is as much a mental exercise as it is physical. So go ahead and break some supposed rule now and then, if it makes you stronger in some way. I’ll be the last one to report you!

Peak Training and Power Loss

WELL, WHAT A WEEK IT’S BEEN. From fatigue to power outages, to working Zero Waste at a frigid 5K on Sunday, it’s been an eventful March!

Last year’s winter training was the toughest I’d ever been through, as I prepared for a Boston qualifying marathon in April, and my first 100-mile race in June. “This is peak training,” I remember telling a friend while running on the Body Specs treadmill following a workout. “This is as bad as it gets.”

Well, this winter’s training put the lie to that.

Like last year, I’m training for a spring marathon (Boston!) and a June 100-miler. The difference is that this year’s big race (Lighthouse 100) is on pavement instead of trail. The harder surface affects the legs much differently than dirt and grass, as evidenced by how my legs felt after the Martian Marathon last year. The race was on a Saturday, and my quads stopped screaming the following Thursday.

And just think – I had two whole weeks until my next race!

So as my new coach and I agreed, I need to toughen up my legs for a road ultra. And the best way to do that is – surprise – run more miles. So in addition to my stepped-up strength training, I’m running 5-6 days per week instead of 2-3, with distance up from 20-30 miles per week to 40-50 miles.

Damn right I’m always hungry! I’m training!

To my surprise, my body responded well to the extra work. At one point I ran 14 days straight, with legs feeling strong. I was rocking it!

Until last week.

Last Tuesday I went out for an afternoon tempo run. After a warmup jog, I kicked up my pace to 7:00 per mile, a strong but not all-out effort for me. Almost immediately I realized it wasn’t going to work. After just a quarter mile I stopped to catch my breath and reset.

Just get through this, I told myself. Go slower, but don’t stop again until the tempo part is over. I did it at a 7:15 pace, but the next day I hadn’t recovered well and was sluggish at the gym. Then I went home – and found the power was out, thanks to Windstorm of The Century here in southeast Michigan.

Feeling overtrained plus dealing with no electricity at home was an ideal opportunity to take a break and recover. So I rested both Thursday AND Friday. Such luxury!

Saturday, feeling better, I ran with my coach, who’s recovering from an injury and gradually increasing his pace and distance. He was doing “just 12 miles” that day and said he felt bad he wasn’t up to running 20 miles yet.

“You’ve got plenty of 20-milers left in you,” I told him. Then I admitted that I understood his frustration. After all, I felt guilty taking two days off.

I’m sure that sounds crazy to my non-running readers, but that’s life when you’re a committed runner. It’s as another blogger recently put it; you feel guilty when you run too much (at the expense of the rest of your life), and you feel guilty when you run too little. You can’t escape it. So you just acknowledge it and keep on running.

This morning, finally, our power came back on. I’d like to say I felt like Superman at the gym today. Not so much, but it wasn’t bad. And they went easy (relatively) because I have the Pi Run 5K on Tuesday. It promises to be cold and miserable. But hey, it’s good training!

When a Run Ain’t So Fun

ANY RUNNER WILL TELL YOU that while every run is unique, a pattern will emerge over time. Most of them will be somewhere in the “okay” range – it was good, glad you did it, end of story. There will be a few glorious runs when you feel indestructible and never want to stop. And there will be a few times when the entire experience just plain sucks.

Today’s 18-miler was one of the last kind.

Yeah, sometimes it does.

Yeah, sometimes it does.

Perhaps it was due to my stupid cat who started crying for breakfast at 4:15 a.m. Or it was the cumulative effect of my increased mileage the past three weeks. Or, maybe it was just one of those days and it was going to happen regardless.

The Saturday PR group run begins at 8:00 a.m., but I’ve started doing a few miles before then so the main run isn’t quite as long. So I crawled out of bed at 6:15, fed Miss Obnoxious and her sisters, drove to the studio, and got in just under four miles before joining the group.

It's a good thing she's so damn cute.

It’s a good thing she’s so damn cute.

Those early miles were among my toughest this year so far. It was bitingly cold and I felt creaky and lethargic, with zero motivation. But as I returned to the studio, the sun came up and lifted my spirits. After some water and a bite to eat, I figured the remaining fourteen miles would be the normal, “okay” kind.

Not so much.

I did finally get warm, and starting out with a large, enthusiastic group is fun. But my body still felt leaden and I struggled to hold my standard long-run pace. For a few miles I chatted with other runners, which always helps the miles slip by. But all too soon I was by myself, far out of town, with a lot of miles to go.

Our club's not afraid of a little cold weather!

Our club’s not afraid of a little cold weather! (Photo courtesy Chuanwu Xi)

Usually at some point on a long run, I ease into a steady stride and can relax and be grateful for being out there doing something healthy and enjoyable. About halfway through I thought I was there. It was sunny and bright, I was on a comfortable dirt road, and feeling almost normal.

Then my kidneys went into overdrive. How does drinking a half-cup of water result in the need to pee out a gallon? Twice? And try as I might, I just couldn’t shake the heavy body feeling. So it was slog, slog, slog the rest of the way back.

But you know what? I did it. Not that I’d given myself much choice. The route was an out-and-back, so after pushing myself to the turnaround point, there was no shortcut. Cruel, but effective.

You know you're in trouble when you see each of these as a potential toilet.

You know you’re in trouble when you see these only as potential toilets.

And while these types of runs are miserable, they’re actually very valuable. It’s outstanding preparation for a race, when you’re giving it your all and are guaranteed to be uncomfortable. Getting through a bad run, no matter how awful it feels, toughens both body and mind for the events that really mean something to you.

It had been a while since my last bad run, so I was probably overdue. Now that it’s over, I can be properly grateful for it. And I gave my weary body some consolation, downing two pastries at Sweetwaters instead of my usual one. I think I can afford it.

Now what to do about my “recovery run” on Sunday? Part of me wants to blow it off, and the rest of me doesn’t want to think about it right now. So we’ll see. I get the feeling I’ll sneak it in, though. After all, it can hardly feel worse.

Event Cancelled Due to Good Weather

I GOT THE UNFORTUNATE NEWS THIS AFTERNOON. My event this weekend has been cancelled.

Due to good weather.

frozen-watters-cancelled

Here was the promo for the “Frozen Watters” event planned for Feb. 25:

In the spirit of our Muddy Watters Trail Series, this race will cover lots of trails, stairs, hills, two track and bushwhacking routes for between 3-4 miles’ish. There will be exercise stops. Pray for snow because sledding down a dirt hill sucks! … Mandatory Gear? A disc to sled on – seriously. Not some big ass sled. You’re going to have to carry it for the entire race!

So I bought a disc sled (BTW, $27.99 seems like a lot to pay for a curved piece of plastic) and hoped for the best. Which, in a sense, happened, and in another sense, did not.

If you’ve been following the weather here in southeastern Michigan, you know that both our big dumpings of snow this winter have vanished completely. While there was sufficient snow in Grand Rapids for the Yankee Springs Winter Challenge, and in Traverse City for the Bigfoot Snowshoe Race, there was no such luck here.

Not all that long ago. . .

Not all that long ago. . .

So why not just have a trail race on Saturday instead of a snow race? The problem, according to the race director, is that the trails are so wet, we would put ruts in them that would subsequently freeze over and cause trouble all summer. So it’s a scrub. But I’ll be able to apply the race fee to one of their other races, so we’ll see.

And it’s not like I haven’t appreciated the sunshine and warm temperatures. I’ve been able to run in shorts several times already, although I do that anyway if it’s above freezing. But yesterday’s 8-miler was the ultimate.

february-sunny-day-run

What is that big yellow ball up there?

As you can see, I’m in shorts and a single shortsleeve shirt. But I also felt the need to wear sunglasses and – sunscreen! That’s a February first. It was a great run. Saw lots of cyclists out there, too.

So Saturday will be my regular long run with PR Run Club. Just as well, since the race would have been only about 4 miles and I need to keep my volume up. While short races right now are a fun diversion, my main goal is to be ready for the big ones coming up – Boston and Trail Marathons in April, Dirty German in May, and Lighthouse in June. That’s 204.4 miles of race in eight weeks. Since I did much the same thing last year, I know it can be done. I’d just like to finish in better condition this time. I have plans for the second half of the year!

And speaking of “other plans” – I’ve just received word from my friend on the Wet Coast (pun intended) that the date of my “covert event” has been set for June 24. I’ll spill the beans later, but if you can’t wait for it, a little research should give you the answer.

Next event: the Pi Day Race – 3.14 miles – on (of course) March 14!