Vote for Me! Vote for a Fit America!

I’m not running for President, but I have an agenda. One that the leading two candidates haven’t said a peep about, to my knowledge. This is an outrage. Why aren’t people talking about the issues that really count for something?

Unfortunately, I’m not sure any President would have the ability to implement the platform I describe below, despite its undoubted value. I’m thinking there would have to be a Supreme Overlord or the like to get it done. I humbly submit myself to take on this daunting task. I promise to be firm, yet benevolent.

I’m calling my campaign: “Make America Fit Again.”


Here’s how I get this country into shape, physically, economically, and emotionally.

1. More “honest” calorie counts and fat/sugar totals on snack food packages. Oh, the makers of the scrumptious-looking muffins below may be telling the truth on the labels, but look closely – one muffin is two servings. Who eats half a muffin?



2.  Corporate CEOs who enable unethical behavior to boost profits and rake in huge bonuses would be prosecuted and serve their time as stockers at Wal-Mart. Tote that cart! Lift that box! We’ll sweat out that sense of entitlement!

3 . Wide paved shoulders required on all paved roads, or a paved bike/multipurpose path alongside them. The streets should be safe for walkers, cyclists, and anyone else who prefers self-powered means of transportation.

4.  Mandatory martial arts or yoga & meditation classes for all school-age children, starting at age five. Imagine an entire generation with self-discipline, introspection, respect for everyone, and physical fitness. Who’d be left to start the wars?


5.  When a politician says something untrue during a debate, speech, or public appearance, a whistle goes off and they have to do 30 burpees before they can continue.

They'd be the two fittest people on the planet!

They’d be the two fittest people on the planet!

6 . “Diets” would be outlawed. As would “fat burning” supplements and all so-called weight loss miracles. Waste of money at best, dangerous at worst.

7.  Recycling and composting services throughout the country. And a nationwide 25-cent deposit law for all glass and aluminum containers. Stop throwing perfectly recyclable soda and beer cans in the trash – or, for Pete’s sake, on the ground.


From the “My San Antonio” blog.

8.  Minimum environmental sustainability taxes for individuals and corporations. Clean air, water, and land benefits everyone, and is worth the cost. What kind of planet do you want to leave your grandkids?

And just to round things off, two morality rules to piss off liberals and conservatives alike:

9.  When two people meet for the first time in the day, the first words out of their mouths must be something kind about the other person. After that, they can fight. If they still want to.

10.  When someone identifies a race, society, or religion and says, “they are the problem,” he or she has to live among “them” for a year.


Do you agree with my platform? Would it result in a fitter America? Let me know your thoughts. I may be seeking absolute power over everyone and everything, but that doesn’t mean I’m not open-minded. We can agree to disagree!

The only thing I haven’t worked out quite yet is how to become Supreme Overlord. I am a big fan of our Constitution, after all. I just wish more of our current politicians were, too.

Are You “Spartan Fit”? Would You Want to Be?

NOTE: The following is a review of a dangerous book. If you’re happy with your life in every way, I advise you to avoid this post. And if you think you’re some kind of stud/ripping bitch athlete, the Surgeon General has determined that reading this book will be hazardous to your ego.




When I got an invitation to review a new fitness book, I didn’t jump on it at first.

After all, the world is full of such books, and the basic advice is universal: Exercise toward your goal. Eat better. Sleep more. Drink lots of water. And so forth. Good advice to be sure, but nothing new under the sun. And the book was about obstacle races, which don’t appeal to me. But the person issuing the invitation was persistent, so I agreed and downloaded the preview copy.

I’m glad I did.

Spartan Fit cover

Spartan Fit! by Joe DeSena is a book aimed at making you exactly that. It contains a 30-day program to prepare you for competing in a Spartan obstacle race. But its true purpose is to challenge you to overcome your biggest obstacle, which is, of course, yourself. And you don’t need to run a Spartan Race to do that.

So what does it take to get “Spartan Fit”? Here’s DeSena’s simplest “training program” in Chapter 1:

Go outside right now and run as far as you can. Then do as many burpees as you can. Then run, walk, or crawl home. Eat whole foods, skip dessert, don’t get drunk, get some sunshine, take cold showers, lift something heavy, use the stairs, meditate or pray, find someone to love. Lights out at 8 p.m. There’s your program— go do it.

To me, that’s a Texas penitentiary, not a desirable way to live. So you might think I wouldn’t encourage anyone to read this book. But you should read it, even if you have no interest in Spartan Races, or running a marathon someday, or in pursuing any Big Hairy Audacious Goal.

It’s worth reading just for its stories. Like Jay Jackson’s fight for his life with a home intruder, or “The Barn Beast” attempting a 100-mile snowshoe race, or Steven Pressfield’s descriptions of life in ancient Sparta and how and why Spartan warriors became legendary for their ability and fearlessness in battle.

And for current and aspiring athletes, there’s lots more in here for you. Descriptions of typical Spartan Race obstacles. The “seven pillars” of the program (endurance, strength, athleticism, recovery, nutrition, mind, and code). Nutrition guidance and recipes. And throughout the book you can feel the intense sincerity of the author in trying to get you outside and do some living, dammit.

Rather than describe more of the book’s content, I’ll share how reading the book affected me and why I consider it to be distinctly different from other fitness books I’ve read.

In sum, I was awestruck, inspired, humbled, and terrified. All at once, more or less.

Awestruck by the incredible things the human body and mind are capable of, as evidenced by the stories in the book. Inspired, because I thought to myself, I could do some of this.

Humbled when I read through the 30-day program and realized that as fit as I am currently, I’d be absolutely obliterated by it. Pick up and carry a 115-pound stone? Not yet, thank you. And terrified, because I began to get the nagging idea that I just might want to try a Spartan Race someday.

But what got me so into this book? Here are three things I believe make Spartan Fit! different from the rest.

Training for adaptability. Spartan Race training is designed for competing in Spartan Races, obviously, but each race is different in the obstacles that the athletes will face. So basic techniques such as running, crawling, and lifting are stressed over specific challenges (such as climbing over a slippery wall).

Adaptability allows you to face any unexpected obstacle – physical, mental, whatever – that you may face in the course of your day. It’s like the jazz musician who doesn’t practice improvisations directly, but all the skills needed to successfully improvise. If I get nothing else out of this book, improving here would make it worth it to me.

Focus on simplicity. This training is meant to be done with things found all around us, or are readily available. VersaClimber in the gym? Run up that hill a few times instead. Kettlebells? Who needs them? Find a rock. Carry logs, drag tires, climb ropes, run and crawl through muck. That’s the essence of Spartan training.

Emphasis on training outside. DeSena points out that the original “gymnasiums” were outdoor athletic areas where the athletes trained together. He contrasts that with the “depressing dungeons,” air-conditioned, carpeted indoor gyms full of fancy equipment, and believes that the surfers on the beach would crush the bodybuilders in an obstacle race. So his workouts are outside, in any weather. And as a year-round, all-weather runner, I understand the benefits, and I agree with him.

Get outside and live, man!

Get outside and live, man!

And the book has already affected my life. This year I participated in the 22 Pushup Challenge – 22 pushups a day for 22 days (read about the purpose here). One day I forgot to do them. When I realized this the next day, I assigned myself the standard Spartan Race “failure penalty” of 30 burpees. Let’s just say I didn’t forget again. As much as I disliked doing them, I could tell how lots of them could make one that much stronger.

One more demonstration of how much I recommend this book; when the preview edition expired, I bought a copy. I suppose that’s really all I needed to say. But since I wrote the rest of this post anyway, guess I’ll use it.


P.S. I was also provided with a discount code for a future Spartan race. If I ever use it, I’ll be sure to write about the experience here!

Does This Phone Make Me Look Fat?

I WAS TEASED YET AGAIN recently about when I’m going to get a smartphone.

And yet again I supplied one of my stock reasons (*) for continuing to use my Stone-Age flip phone.

I don’t deny smartphones are useful. On a recent trip to Colorado, my wife and daughter used their phones to navigate to restaurants, research bicycles, and take photos of our hikes and the beautiful mountain scenery. Occasionally they even used them to make phone calls.

At the top of Horsetooth Falls in Fort Collins, reached without any help from a fitness tracker.

At the top of Horsetooth Falls in Fort Collins, reached without any help from smart devices.

But as has become so apparent lately, it’s easy to get too absorbed in all this connectivity. And a new catch phrase has appeared to describe it: digital obesity. Like the term implies, it’s meant to correlate with the problem of physical obesity.

This article in Fastcoexist sums it up pretty well. (Excerpt condensed.)

The more people eat (and consume, in general), the better it is for those that provide food. That’s the point of the…food additives that every consumer unwittingly ingests every single year. These substances are the lubricants of over-consumption … That is the same principle that is happening when you use Facebook or your smartphone. The food industry actually calls this “cravability.”

A new kind of obesity is now looming with our information, data, and media diet. [T]here is already way too much of information available, and it is way too tasty, too cheap, and too rich. Not a single day goes by without yet another service offering us…more news, more music, more movies, more, better and cheaper mobile devices, and a seemingly total social connectivity. Many of us are likely to pig out like we’re at an all-you-can-eat buffet.

Never before is so much information available at a moment’s notice. And it’s so easy to gorge on digital content that the rest of our lives can suffer. Time we used to spend interacting (in-person, I mean) with family and friends, or in solitude and reflection, is instead spent binge-watching Netflix or playing video games online.

And what about physical activity? The flood of data has carried there too. Smartphone apps, GPS watches, and fitness trackers give us real-time information on just about any vital sign or body function. But I wonder if people who buy data force-feeding gear actually benefit. Do they use the data to exercise more or exercise better, leading to increased fitness?


My guess is that it depends on one’s attitude toward fitness. Just buying the gear isn’t going to turn a couch potato into a gym rat. They can even backfire when the information they supply is blindly believed, as this article describes.

My wife bought a fitness tracker and uses it to track her walking goals, such as 10,000 steps in a day. But it was part of her general plan to increase her fitness; she was already walking more and going to the gym. Her device is a support tool, not a change agent. And I use a Garmin GPS watch while running, but I can run fine without it (although I reflexively tap my wrist when I stop).

For me, exercise time is “disconnect” time. Running, cycling, Aikido, and gym workouts are my way to step away from the data buffet. (Believe it or not, I still print paper maps for my long bike trips instead of a nav app.) Disconnecting quiets my mind, allowing the subconscious to process the information I’ve taken in. Many people use meditation for the same purpose.


Not owning a smartphone also saves me from some of the digital flood that creates Poke-zombies and distracted drivers. But my laptop supplies all the digital food I could want. Just reading emails would take up an entire day if I let it. And Quora is my favorite junk food – it has far too much interesting content to be good for me.

There’s more I could say, but for now I have to go. Can’t wait to find out if “an Imperial Star Destroyer is well designed from a military point of view.” Yes, that’s an actual Quora question, and someone provided a detailed answer. Check it out, if you dare – it’s addictive. You have been warned.

(Note to readers: thanks for stopping by my digital restaurant. I assure you my posts are non-fattening, and full of nutritious bits. And they’re organic, too. Honest.)


(*)  These include high cost of data plan, fragility on trails, and lack of situational awareness, which is the one I chose this time.

Hydration Salvation

I had no idea getting water into my body was so complicated.

Yesterday morning I was on the Pinckney area trails with other runners training for the Run Woodstock ultramarathons in two weeks. While I will be volunteering this year and not running an ultra, I’ll accept any excuse for a run with fellow trail enthusiasts.

The morning was warm and humid, and as is standard with trail runners, we carried water bottles. When we felt like we needed a drink, we took one. And when our bottles got low, we refilled them from gallon jugs that the wonderful RF Events staff put out for us at various points along the trail. After finishing, I wrung out my shirt and went for coffee.

Regular bottles filled with regular water? Oh, the tragedy of ignorance!

Regular bottles filled with regular water? Oh the humanity!

Little did I know how behind the times we were. We’re highly trained athletes and depend on keeping our bodies in peak condition. Can you believe I ran for three hours and AT NO TIME did I know if I was optimally hydrated, or what exactly was in those gallon jugs. Ignorance is bliss!

So imagine my shock when I came across this latest entry in the Stuff I Didn’t Know I Needed department.

Pryme Vessyl hydration tracker

More than just a water bottle, the Pryme Vessyl Hydration Tracker hooks up with your Fitbit or other fitness tracker to monitor your hydration level. The idea is that you can be optimally hydrated throughout the day, as least as long as you’re carrying the bottle around. Here’s what the Product Description on Amazon says:

Pryme is your personal hydration metric. It takes into account your height, weight, age, and biological sex, as well as ever-changing factors such as your activity level and hours of sleep. Whether you bike, lift weights, or simply walk to work each day, Pryme Vessyl also connects with Fitbit, Jawbone Up, and Apple Health to let you know how close you are to your Pryme.

The blue light means you’re Prymed for your moments of greatness. Optimal hydration can lead to mental balance, physical endurance, more energy, healthier skin and much more. In concert with the app, Pryme provides real-time personalized insights and notifications to help you get to and stay at your best.

Just think of what I’ve been missing. When I’m out on the trail, I could get a to-the-second alert on when to take a drink, and not rely on such a crude indicator as thirst. And if I’m at Body Specs heaving and groaning my way through a tough set? BEEP BEEP! “Sorry, Skip, need a moment! I’m losing my optimal hydration!”

Drink of water here, boss?

Drink of water here, boss?

Now such hydration perfection doesn’t come cheap. The Pryme Vessyl is $120.00 on Amazon. I suppose it’s not really that much compared to an investment in a fitness tracker and smartphone. But since I don’t have those either, I’ll have to rely on other people to tell me if the PV is worth it. (Your comments are welcome.)

So that’s all well and good, but even with perfect timing, your personal hydration is only as good as the water you’re drinking. And thanks to modern technology, you don’t need to settle for ordinary tap water or regular old bottled water. No sir, why bother with that when you can have – wait for it – Zero Water!

Zero Water pitcher

Tested and certified by the Water Quality Association and NSF International for removal of several minerals, ZeroWater is the only filtration system that fits the FDA definition of purified bottled water. The ZeroWater pitcher not only improves the taste of your tap water, it also helps to improve the environment. When you use the ZeroWater Pitcher, you’ll reduce your use of plastic water bottles that clog up landfills and harm ecosystems. You’ll also contribute to water conservation, because unlike reverse-osmosis systems, ZeroWater is gravity operated and doesn’t waste electricity or water.

Now I’m big on improving the environment. After all, I’m heading up the RF Events Zero Waste team this year. So Zero Water sounds like a perfect fit for my lifestyle, doesn’t it?

Well, Bohemian that I am, I wouldn’t have bothered with this innovation either. Fortunately (?), my wife found out about this and made the investment for me. So we have a large Zero Water filter pitcher sitting in our refrigerator.

And how is the water? Actually, it’s pretty good, compared to our home’s tap water and especially the tap water at work, where I admit to running it through a Brita before making coffee. As for why the Zero Water tastes good, perhaps it’s the magic filter, or perhaps just because it’s pre-chilled. I guess I don’t really care. She’s happy with it and is drinking more water, so life is good.

Come to think of it, she also has a Fitbit and a smartphone, which means she could also use the Pryme Vessyl hydration tracker. I hope she’s not reading this post.